Talitha Bullock
   
  
 
  
    
  
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      People often debate whether or not one can be truly fulfilled by what she does – do you feel fulfilled by your work?     I really do. There’s not a day that goes by that I don’t feel honored and blessed to do this work. After each session, be that therapy or photography, I learn a bit more about the human experience, about myself and my body.          Where else do you derive creative/emotional/intellectual fulfillment?     I take walks, like a lot of them. In some ways I feel like an elderly woman, taking my nightly strolls, listening, reflecting, and turning inward. There’s something sacred about walking. There’s a rhythm to it that feels spiritual for me. I take in the little things that I normally miss when I’m driving by or texting (not doing both at once :)
   
  
 
  
    
  
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      Name one instance that made you feel vulnerable, unprepared, and/or scared:     Ugg…There’s that word, “vulnerable.” The emotion that we as humans try and stay far from. And yet, situations, relationships, this work asks me to be vulnerable all the time. I feel vulnerable when someone expects something from me. When I show up to a shoot, there’s this mixture of vulnerability and confidence. It’s like those two have a conversation with one another throughout the shoot. I just continue to let those two exist for me.            What helped you navigate that challenge?     Reminding myself that I am human, that I mess up, that I disappoint people, even myself.
   Name your greatest professional achievement:     I would say, when I had the opportunity to shoot a cook book for an amazing celebrity chef named Domenica Catelli! I learned a TON about food photography and it helped me pay for grad school!          Name your greatest personal achievement:     Being in therapy. The time and money I have put into self-examination and healing...definitely consider that a personal achievement
   Who do you have a girl crush on? Why?     My dearest friend, Andria Linquist! She is resilient, intelligent, and super business savvy! Her photography work is so gorgeous! Her energy is contagious! And she so giving too! I could keep going if you want.....?          Who are you intimidated by? Why?     I don’t really get intimidated by others. Strange to admit, but true. I moved around my whole life and had to consistently be meeting new people. Some more famous than others, some more successful to the worlds standards than others. We are all human though. I tend to land back at that reality.
   What’s a meaningful piece of advice you have been given, and who gave it to you?     Advice is often replaced with questions that help me engage my heart. Christie Lynk, a favorite professor and mentor of mine continues to ask these 2 important questions; “What do I want?” “How will I participate in that?”          At what age did you feel most vulnerable, and why?     I’ve always felt vulnerable. I wasn’t able to name it as that until my adult years. The moments I have felt desire, I have felt vulnerability
   What advice would you share with that former self?     That desire is good. That vulnerability is good. And then I would give me a HUGE HUG!          How do you see your life 30 years from now?     Taking nightly walks and continuing to love others well.
   What steps are you taking currently to achieve that vision of your future?     Doing exactly that.
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